Fall 2022

We the Jury: Deliberation and Justice

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Charles R. Nesson (Harvard Law School)
Rebecca N. Nesson (John A. Paulson School Of Engineering And Applied Sciences)

Freshman Seminar 72T 4 credits (fall term) Enrollment: Limited to 12

A founding principle of the United States is that We the People, not a ruler or his designee, are to decide issues of justice. The mechanism by which We exercise our power of justice is the jury, as guaranteed in the...

Read more about We the Jury: Deliberation and Justice

The World of Tomorrow: Constructing and Inhabiting the 21st Century

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Arthur I. Segel (Harvard Business School)
Freshman Seminar 70P     4 credits (fall term)    Enrollment:  Limited to 12

“Today, we are shapers of the world of tomorrow. There is no way we can duck the responsibility, and there is no reason why we should.” ~ Walt Disney

Please Note: there will be two required trips on the afternoons of Tues, Oct 18 & Oct 25, 12:30-5pm. Please check that...

Read more about The World of Tomorrow: Constructing and Inhabiting the 21st Century

Wit, Irony, Comedy

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Thomas Wisniewski (Department of Comparative Literature)
Freshman Seminar 65E  4 credits (fall term)  Enrollment:  Limited to 12

In life, as in literature, humor often takes us by surprise: it gives delight; it lightens our mood; it makes us laugh. The question is: why? Laughter, in many ways, is a mystery. If tragedy’s existence is all too easy to explain— suffering needs to be borne, and...

Read more about Wit, Irony, Comedy

The Good, the Bad, and the Beautiful: The Ethics of Art

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

P. Quinn White (Department of Philosophy)
Freshman Seminar 65F           4 credits (fall term)       Enrollment:  Limited to 12

What, if anything, is the relationship between art and morality? Can art be immoral? Or is it a mistake to evaluate a work of art in such terms? Can the moral of a content of a work bear on its ...

Read more about The Good, the Bad, and the Beautiful: The Ethics of Art

The Chinese Language, Present and Past

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

C.-T. James Huang (Department of Linguistics)
Freshman Seminar 33R       4 credits (fall term)                   Enrollment:  Limited to 12

Prerequisite: Some experience of the Chinese language is required as a pre-requisite for taking the seminar (e.g., a minimum of one semester of prior formal instruction, or as a heritage speaker of Mandarin or any Chinese dialect). To...

Read more about The Chinese Language, Present and Past

Religion and the Black Protest Tradition

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham (Department of History and Department of African and African American Studies)
Freshman Seminar 72S     4 credits (fall term)     Enrollment:  Limited to 12

This seminar explores the long tradition of Black protest against racial discrimination and oppression in the United States by focusing on the role of religion, as represented by selected individuals, institutions, and movements for social change during the pre-Civil War Era, the Civil...

Read more about Religion and the Black Protest Tradition

Recent Experimental Architecture From AutoCAD to Ziggurat

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Andrew J. Holder (Harvard Graduate School of Design)
Freshman Seminar 64Z 4 credits (fall term) Enrollment: Limited to 12

There is a paradox in contemporary architecture. It is designed using tools of astounding digital sophistication by architects grappling with a world of social inequities and impending environmental catastrophe. And yet, surveying the work of these architects, you would be forgiven for thinking it looks, well, ancient: ziggurats, stacks, rock piles, and...

Read more about Recent Experimental Architecture From AutoCAD to Ziggurat

Race, Science, and the Law: Knowledge and Power in the U.S. and Beyond

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Sebastian Jackson (Committee on Degrees on Social Studies)
Freshman Seminar 72V          4 credits (fall term)       Enrollment:  Limited to 12

How have the natural and social sciences contributed to the cultural invention of “race” as a social fact of modernity, and to the historical development of structural racism? How has seemingly “objective” scientific knowledge concerning the diversity of...

Read more about Race, Science, and the Law: Knowledge and Power in the U.S. and Beyond

Metamorphoses of Life

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

(CANCELLED)
Daniel Carranza (Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures)
Freshman Seminar 64S     4 credits (fall term)     Enrollment:  Limited to 12 

If trees could speak, what would they say? How does that annoying fly buzzing around perceive the room you both inhabit – perceive you? And what kind of traumatic shock could transform you into a mute tree? Or lead you...

Read more about Metamorphoses of Life

Knowing Cicero

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Jared M. Hudson (Department of the Classics)
Freshman Seminar 62L  4 credits (fall term)  Enrollment:  Limited to 12

Note: No prior knowledge of Cicero, Latin, or the ancient Roman world is assumed or required in order to take this seminar. The seminar will include a visit to Houghton Library to examine some of the library’s rare manuscripts of Cicero’s works.

More than any other...

Read more about Knowing Cicero

Is Privacy Dead? Privacy, Surveillance, and Freedom in the Digital Age

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Lowry Pressly (Committee on Degrees in Social Studies)
Freshman Seminar 72W 4 credits (fall term) Enrollment: Limited to 12

Suppose that someone is listening to your phone calls and reading your emails, but you never find out and your life is never affected. What reason do you have to complain? Does it make a difference if it’s a neighbor, a lover, the state, or an algorithm listening in? What if you are the one posting the information on Facebook? Do we have a right not to be tracked, photographed, or surveilled in public? In this...

Read more about Is Privacy Dead? Privacy, Surveillance, and Freedom in the Digital Age

Pages